English and Technical Communication

Missouri S&T's Department of English and Technical Communication is the only program in Missouri to blend the humanistic study of English with the principles and practices of technical communication in a single degree program. The STEM-focused environment of S&T sets us apart from any of our peer programs in English or technical communication: it allows us to leverage S&T's existing strengths in STEM and to focus on adaptive thinking and ethical training that today's job market demands and that global citizenship requires. The ETC program provides students with innovative undergraduate research and coursework opportunities that do not exist in traditional departments, including the chance to complete several client-based classroom projects that allow students to collaborate professionally with customers and other colleagues. The ETC program teaches students to use technology in order to make complex topics understandable and to make information usable. As a  result, our graduates are in high demand and find career opportunities in a wide range of professional domains, including engineering, health care, technology, education, publishing, government, natural sciences, and nonprofits. ETC majors at S&T can even earn a master's degree in technical communication with only one additional year of study past graduation.

The interdisciplinary nature of the ETC degree at Missouri S&T enables you to acquire the qualifications you need to be competitive and flexible in an ever-changing technological environment. When you graduate, you will have a solid technical background in computer-enhanced information systems, an understanding of how organizations function, and strong communication skills. Areas employing our graduates include computer manufacturing and software development, consumer electronics, banking and financial institutions, telecommunications, chemical and pharmaceuticals, hospitals and research labs, and academic institutions and libraries. Our graduates become teachers, writers, editors, designers, and managers, and they hold job titles such as UI/UX Manager, Operational Excellence Analyst, Social Media Strategist, Visual Information Specialist, and Senior Technical Writer.

In technical communication courses, you will study both the theory and practice of communication in written, oral and visual forms, and produce a variety of technical documents in print, electronic, and digital forms. Because technical communicators work at the interface of technical experts and product users, you will gain experience with project management in a user community and become adept in audience analysis, needs assessment, document design, and team building.

English coursework involves the study of language, literature, and culture. Topics include literary history, criticism, literary forms, and detailed examinations of individual authors. Additional genre and theme courses are available, including world literature, literature and film, and science fiction. Linguistics and writing courses include the history and structure of the English language, advanced composition, and creative writing. Speech and media studies courses focus on oral modes of communication and the social dynamics of leadership in groups and organizations.

If you plan to become a secondary school teacher of English/language arts, the department offers an emphasis area in secondary education.

Eleven minors are available. American studies, creative writing, literature, writing, technical communication, literature and film, linguistics, social media in industry, game studies, communication studies, and leadership communication. You can major in any other academic filed and minor in these areas.

Bachelor of Science
English & Technical Communication

Students must complete a minimum of 120 hours for a Bachelor of Science in English & Technical Communication, and obtain a grade point average of 2.0. These requirements for the B.S. are in addition to credit received for basic ROTC.

Communications. Student must take the following 9 hours of courses:
ENGLISH 1120Exposition And Argumentation3
ENGLISH 2002Critical Approaches To Literature3
One writing intensive course out of major OR two writing emphasized courses out of major3

Math and Sciences.  Students must take 18 hours of math and science courses, including at least one in biological science and one in the physical sciences and at least one math course at the level of college algebra or higher. In addition to these requirements, students may count STAT 1115, up to 3 hours from psychology classes, and up to 3 hours from history of science and technology classes (HISTORY 2510, HISTORY 3510, or HISTORY 3530), but may not use them to satisfy another requirement. 

Humanities. Students must complete 9 hours in humanities with at least one course from each of the following: literature, philosophy, and fine arts (Art, Music, or Theater Appreciation). 

Social Sciences. Students must complete 12 hours in social science courses. Students must take at least one course in two of these four areas: economics, history, political science, and psychology. 

One of the following courses must be taken to satisfy the requirement of the state of Missouri (the "Williams Law"); this course may count toward fulfilling the social sciences requirement
HISTORY 1200Modern Western Civilization3
HISTORY 1300American History To 18773
HISTORY 1310American History Since 18773
POL SCI 1200American Government3

English and Technical Communication. Students must complete 33 credit hours of courses in ENGLISH and/or TCH COM. The student must earn a grade of C or better in these required courses. 

All students must take the following 9 hours for the major:

ENGLISH 2410Theory Of Written Communication3
TCH COM 4410Theory and Practice of Technical Communication3
TCH COM 5620Research Methods in Technical Communication3

Each student chooses at least one of the following CORE MODULES, which helps define each student's focus for the degree and provides foundational skills within that focus:

I. Technical Communication (12 hours):

TCH COM 1600Introduction to Technical Communication3
TCH COM 2540Layout and Design3
TCH COM 5510Technical Editing3
One of the following:
TCH COM 3550Writing for Social Media3
TCH COM 3580Business Communication3
TCH COM 3570Writing in the Sciences3
TCH COM 5560Web-Based Communication3

II. Literature (12 hours):

  • One 1000 or 2000 level literature class
  • One 2000 or 3000 level literature class with a “media” or “genre” designation
  • One 3000 level literature class with a geographical designation
  • One 3000 level literature class with a historical or cultural designation

III. Linguistics (12 hours):

ENGLISH 3301A Linguistic Study Of Modern English3
ENGLISH 3302History And Structure Of The English Language3
ENGLISH 3303The Grammatical Structure of English3
ENGLISH 3304Language in Society3

Students should choose the remaining required hours in E&TC in consultation with their advisor to complete specialized modules and certificates that correspond with their interests and future goals. Specialized modules are generally sets of 3-4 courses that allow students to pursue specialized areas of our degree program. Please refer to E&TC website and/or consult your advisor for a full list of current modules and certificates. Some of these include: Creative Writing, Professional Writing, Game Studies, English Education, Digital Presence Management.

Electives Credit. Each student will elect sufficient additional courses to complete a minimum of 120 credit hours, at the discretion of the major adviser. Electives housed in other departments can and should be used to fulfill requirements for interdisciplinary specialized modules and certificates. At least 9 hours of these electives must be at the 3000 or above level, although substitutions may be permitted at the discretion of the major adviser. All electives must accumulate to at least a 2.0 grade point average.

English Education Certification. The student will fulfill the general requirements for the bachelor of science degree, the requirements for the ETC major, and the requirements for Missouri certification in the teaching of English including a 3.0 content and professional requirement GPA, and passage of the Missouri Content exam. Missouri S&T allows students to choose their student teaching placement, if the district agrees and a qualified cooperating teacher is available.  This program is approved by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education for initial teacher certification.  Students intending to teach in other states are responsible for investigating the reciprocity agreement of that state agency. Contact the Missouri S&T English & Tech Com department for advising. Students preparing for teacher certification should note that the major requirements for English certification are as follows:

1.     ENGLISH 1211, ENGLISH 1212, ENGLISH 1221, ENGLISH 1222.

2.     ENGLISH 2002 

3.     Capstone course for major: TCH COM 4410.

4.     Fifteen hours of course work at the 2000 or 3000 level in English and American literature, including two courses in English Literature; and two American Literature courses, including literature for adolescents.

5.     Six hours of linguistics.

6.     Twelve hours of writing, including a course in the teaching of writing. Six of these hours will also be satisfied by the general education composition requirement for the B.S. degree; three of these hours will also be satisfied by the capstone course.

7.     A minimum of fifteen hours must be at the 3000 level or above.

Graduate Track Pathway to MS in Technical Communication:

An undergraduate in the Department of English and Technical Communication at Missouri S&T, and select undergraduates in other departments, may opt to apply for the Graduate Track Pathway in Technical Communication (TC). This program allows a student to complete a bachelor’s degree and then the MS in Tech Com in less time than if pursuing each degree consecutively. In this program, 9 hours of TC MS coursework may apply to both the BS and MS requirements. The credit hours transferred from their Missouri S&T bachelor’s degree to their Technical Communication master’s degree may be taken at the lower undergraduate tuition rate.

To be eligible for the GTP, an undergraduate must be one year from completion of their bachelor’s degree (excluding the semester in which they are currently enrolled). They must have completed 9 credit hours of any combination of English and TC courses selected from 1160, 1600, 2002, 2410, 2540, 2560, and any 3000 or 4000 level English or TC course at Missouri S&T with at least a 3.50 GPA in those courses and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.

To be admitted, the student must complete the GTP Admission and Course Approval Form and must have the recommendation of a TC faculty member. Once admitted to the GTP, the student may transfer nine credit hours from their Missouri S&T bachelor’s degree to their Technical Communication master’s degree. Depending on the bachelor’s program, some or all of those hours might also fulfill elective undergraduate categories. These nine hours of shared credit will be charged at the undergraduate tuition rate. The nine hours of shared-credit coursework must be approved by the academic advisor and must be courses approved to be part of the MS curriculum. Taking additional courses for graduate credit beyond these nine hours will require formal application and acceptance to the MS program. Acceptance to the MS program from the GTP is assured so long as the student maintains a 3.0 GPA or higher in TC coursework.

E&TC majors are encouraged to consult with their academic advisor during their sophomore or junior year about preparing for GTP admission.

English Minor Curriculum

All students who minor in English and technical communication must have a minor advisor in the ETC department, must complete a minor form, and must file it with the ETC department. (ENGLISH 1120 Exposition And Argumentation cannot be counted.)

English offers nine minors:

Literature

To complete this minor, students must take 12 hours of Literature courses offered by the English department; at least 9 hours of these must be at the 2000 or 3000-level.

Writing

To complete this minor, students must take ENGLISH 2410 Theory Of Written Communication, plus 9 hours selected from the following courses: ENGLISH 1160, ENGLISH 1600, ENGLISH 1170, ENGLISH 3560, ENGLISH 2560, ENGLISH 3101, ENGLISH 3302, OR ENGLISH 3301.

Literature and Film

The minor requires 12 hours, including the core course, ENGLISH 2230 Literature And Film. In addition, students will take 9 hours of electives in the field of literature and film studies. These electives can include but are not limited to ENGLISH 2248 Thematic Studies in Literature and Film (3 hours), ART 3250 Thematic Studies In Film & Literature (3 hours), and other film courses at the Art 2000-level or above.

American Studies

The minor requires 15 hours, including ENGLISH 1223 Introduction To American Studies and ENGLISH 3228 The American Experience. In addition, the student, in consultation with the minor advisor, will select three courses, one of which must be at the 300 level, from the areas of American art, history, literature, music, or philosophy.

Minor in Technical Communication

To complete this minor students must take TCH COM 1600, TCH COM 2540 (or ENGLISH 2540), and TCH COM 2560 (or ENGLISH 2560) plus six additional hours elected from the 4000-level or above technical communication courses.

Creative Writing

The minor requires 12 hours including ENGLISH 1170 Creative Writing. Students are required to take an advanced writing workshop either ENGLISH 2171 Fiction Writing or ENGLISH 2172 Creative Nonfiction Writing. In consultation with the minor advisor, students will select two additional courses, one of which must be at the 3000-level or higher that emphasize literary craft. Suggested Electives: ENGLISH 2171, ENGLISH 2172ENGLISH 2247, ENGLISH 3219, ENGLISH 3223, ENGLISH 3226, ENGLISH 3232, ENGLISH 3233.

Games Studies

Overall Goals and Objectives:

1. Study games as meaningful systems

2. Research games as narrative devices

3. Reflect on the cultural and social impact of games

4. Develop ways to use games as learning tools

Requirements:

TCH COM 3590Game Studies3
or ENGLISH 3590 Game Studies
TCH COM 5530Usability Studies3
ENGLISH 1170Creative Writing3
or ENGLISH 2171 Fiction Writing
One of the following:
ENGLISH 2232Comics and Graphic Novels3
ENGLISH 2243Science Fiction3
ENGLISH 2244Fantasy Literature3

Linguistics

The field of linguistics provides a view of language that students are often not exposed to during their K-12 education. Linguists are interested in the systematic study of language with particular interest in how people use language to establish their identities and situate themselves in the world. Being exposed to this view of language opens up new modes of thinking for students. In particular, by taking courses in linguistics, students gain an understanding of not only the basic prescriptive rules for correctness that are expected in certain written and spoken genres but also the patterns and features that comprise actual, real-world linguistic usage in a number of different speech communities—patterns that sometimes violate the prescriptive rules. Such an approach cultivates students’ ability to use prescriptively correct language in their speech and writing, which benefits them in future situations in which such correctness is required. Moreover, and perhaps even more importantly, students also gain an increased awareness of the systematic ways in which individual speakers and particular speech communities deviate from the prescriptive norms, using language to foster cultural and social connections and to establish their identities. Such awareness provides students with a new lens through which to view variation and diversity, which can contribute to greater tolerance and acceptance for linguistic—and thus human—difference. Furthermore, with an understanding of linguistic variation as rooted in the principles of multilingualism and intercultural contexts, students can develop specific skills in cross-cultural communication and linguistic accommodation, which will benefit them in future interactions with culturally and linguistically diverse speakers in their jobs and in their everyday lives—situations which are very likely to arise for our students in this increasingly globalized world in which transnational companies and multicultural communities are the norm.

Four required courses:

ENGLISH 3301A Linguistic Study Of Modern English3
ENGLISH 3302History And Structure Of The English Language3
ENGLISH 3303The Grammatical Structure of English3
ENGLISH 3304Language in Society3

Social Media in Industry

The purpose of this minor will be to supplement existing degree programs with the latest knowledge concerning social media. Objectives include training students to write for social media, brand and market products via social media, use social media to conduct user research, and create and manage social media sites such as user forums. "Technical communicators are uniquely suited to serve as community managers of companies' online help forums" (Jordan Frith, "Forum Moderation as Technical Communication: The Social Web and Employment Opportunities for Technical Communicators"). 

ENGLISH 3550Writing for Social Media3
or TCH COM 3550 Writing for Social Media
TCH COM 3580Business Communication3
ENGLISH 2560Technical Marketing Communication3
or TCH COM 2560 Technical Marketing Communication
One of the Following:
TCH COM 5560Web-Based Communication3
or TCH COM 5520 Help Authoring
or TCH COM 3440 Theory of Visual Technical Communication

Certificate in Technical Writing

Admissions Requirements

A student must meet Missouri S&T regular undergraduate admission requirements.

Certificate Requirements

Other Stipulations:

  • A student pursuing the technical communication minor may count the same courses for the minor and the technical writing certificate.
  • A student who already has a bachelor's degree from Missouri S&T may count relevant courses from that degree (e.g., TCH COM 1600) toward the technical writing certificate.
  • The 12 credit hours of technical communication course work may not be counted toward the 60 credit hours of undergraduate college-level transferable course work.

ENGLISH 1000 Special Problems And Readings (IND 0.0-6.0)

Problems or readings on specific subjects or projects in the department. Consent of instructor required.


ENGLISH 1001 Special Topics (IND 0.0-6.0)

This course is designed to give the department an opportunity to test a new course. Variable title.


ENGLISH 1110 English As A Second Language-I (IND 0.0-6.0)

Elementary English for non-English speakers. Conversation and reading. A study of English recommended for international students during their first semester in the United States.


ENGLISH 1120 Exposition And Argumentation (LEC 3.0)

Practice in college level essay writing.
ENGLISH 1120 - MOTR ENGL 100: Composition I


ENGLISH 1160 Writing And Research (LEC 3.0)

Practice in techniques of analytical writing and in methods of research. Prerequisite: English 1120.
ENGLISH 1160 - MOTR ENGL 200: Composition II


ENGLISH 1170 Creative Writing (LEC 3.0)

Practice in forms and techniques of poetry and prose fiction, with special attention to narrative development. Prerequisite: English 1120.


ENGLISH 1211 British Literature I: The Beginnings To 1800 (LEC 3.0)

A survey of works and authors that explores the way these works represent the chronological period and express the individual concerns and techniques of those authors.
ENGLISH 1211 - MOTR LITR 102: British Literature


ENGLISH 1212 British Literature II 1800 To Present (LEC 3.0)

A survey of works and authors that explores the way these works represent the chronological period and express the individual concerns and techniques of those authors.
ENGLISH 1212 - MOTR LITR 102: British Literature


ENGLISH 1221 American Literature: 1600 To 1865 (LEC 3.0)

A chronological survey that explores the ways the literature represents the concerns of individual authors as well as the history of literature.
ENGLISH 1221 - MOTR LITR 101: American Literature


ENGLISH 1222 American Literature: 1865 To Present (LEC 3.0)

A chronological survey that explores the ways the literature represents the concerns of individual authors as well as the history of literature.
ENGLISH 1222 - MOTR LITR 101: American Literature


ENGLISH 1223 Introduction To American Studies (LEC 3.0)

Introduces the core subjects as well as the methods and theories that constitute the field of American Studies.


ENGLISH 1231 World Literature I: From The Beginnings To The Renaissance (LEC 3.0)

A survey of representative works and authors from the world's cultures. (Excludes British and American works).
ENGLISH 1231 - MOTR LITR 200: World Literature


ENGLISH 1600 Introduction to Technical Communication (LEC 3.0)

Introduction to the role of the professional technical communicator in business and industry and practice in methods of developing technical documents. Prerequisite: English 1120. (Co-listed with TCH COM 1600).


ENGLISH 2000 Special Problems And Readings (IND 0.0-6.0)

Problems or readings on specific subjects or projects in the department. Consent of instructor required.


ENGLISH 2001 Special Topics (LEC 0.0-6.0)

This course is designed to give the department an opportunity to test a new course. Variable title.


ENGLISH 2002 Critical Approaches To Literature (LEC 3.0)

Study and application of the terminology and critical approaches used in understanding literary forms and genres.


ENGLISH 2010 Seminar (IND 0.0-6.0)

Discussion of current topics. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2171 Fiction Writing (LEC 3.0)

This course introduces students to concepts of craft in fiction writing and the critical tools writers bring to revision. Students will write and present their own fully-developed stories and examine the stories of others in a workshop format. Prerequisite: English 1120 or equivalent.


ENGLISH 2172 Creative Nonfiction Writing (LEC 3.0)

Students will write creative nonfiction essays about their experiences and the experiences of others. The course will emphasize the revision process, focusing on both sentence-level and global issues. Additionally, this course will introduce students to published writers rhetorical choices. Prerequisite: English 1120 or equivalent.


ENGLISH 2230 Literature And Film (LEC 3.0)

This course will examine intertextual connections between literature and film, in terms of such things as adaptations, narrative technique and theory, genre, theme, and ideological movements. Prerequisite: English 1120.


ENGLISH 2232 Comics and Graphic Novels (LEC 3.0)

Comics and graphic novels represent not only a distinct narrative form, but are also important cultural objects which engages complex questions of identity and culture. This class studies comics and the graphic novel as literature and as a popular art form. Prerequisites: English 1120.


ENGLISH 2240 Children's Literature (LEC 3.0)

Introduction to the study of children's literature. Emphasis on historical developments, multicultural issues and works. Prerequisites: English 1120.


ENGLISH 2241 Literature For Adolescents (LEC 3.0)

Primarily intended for teacher certification students. Selection and organization of materials for teaching literature to adolescents. Emphasizes literature written for adolescents and includes a unit of literature of American ethnic groups. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2242 Literature By Women (LEC 3.0)

A study of writings by women, emphasizing major writers and the development of a female literary tradition. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.
ENGLISH 2242 - MOTR LITR 106: Women's Literature


ENGLISH 2243 Science Fiction (LEC 3.0)

A study of short stories, poems, or novels which represent the development and the techniques of the science fiction genre. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2244 Fantasy Literature (LEC 3.0)

A study of the development of fantasy literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The primary focus will be on novels, especially the work of J.R.R. Tolkien. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2245 African American Literature (LEC 3.0)

The history and development of African American literature, with special emphasis upon contemporary achievements. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.
ENGLISH 2245 - MOTR LITR 105: Multicultural Literature


ENGLISH 2246 The Bible As Literature (LEC 3.0)

Deals with the Old Testament, the Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical books, and the New Testament. Class lectures and discussions focus on literary forms and patterns, use of symbolism, narrative methods, and characterization. The basic approach is literary rather than theological or historical. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2247 American Crime And Detective Fiction (LEC 3.0)

An introduction survey of American crime literature emphasizing the works of Hammett, Chandler, and James M. Cain to the more recent "true crime" tradition beginning with Capote's In Cold Blood. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2248 Thematic Studies in Literature and Film (LEC 3.0)

Topics examine different thematic relationships between literature and film (e.g. Poe and Hitchcock, Shakespeare on film, etc.) announced at time of registration. Prerequisites: English 1120 and semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2250 American Short Story (LEC 3.0)

This course follows the development of the short story genre from its early nineteenth-century beginnings up to and including stories written by contemporary American authors. Prerequisite: English 1120.


ENGLISH 2410 Theory Of Written Communication (LEC 3.0)

Major critical and conceptual approaches to written communication theory; includes semantics, history of print media, visible language, grammars, discourse theory, socio-linguistics reception theory, stylistics. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 2540 Layout And Design (LEC 3.0)

Theory and practice of layout and design for print and electronic media. Prerequisite: English 1600 or TCH COM 1600. (Co-listed with TCH COM 2540).


ENGLISH 2560 Technical Marketing Communication (LEC 3.0)

An introduction to technical marketing communication with an emphasis on relevant genres such as (but not limited to) the data sheet, white paper, and technical demonstration. Prerequisites: English 1600 or Tch Com 1600 or English 1160. (Co-listed with TCH COM 2560).


ENGLISH 3000 Special Problems (IND 0.0-6.0)

Problems or readings on specific subjects or projects in the department. Consent of instructor required.


ENGLISH 3001 Special Topics (LEC 0.0-6.0)

This course is designed to give the department an opportunity to test a new course. Variable title.


ENGLISH 3010 Seminar (RSD 3.0)

Discussion of current topics. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3085 Internship (IND 0.0-6.0)

Internship will involve students applying critical thinking skills and discipline specific knowledge in a work setting based on a project designed by the advisor and employee. Activities will vary depending on the student's background and the setting. Prerequisite: Senior status; must have completed 24 hours in the major.


ENGLISH 3101 Advanced Composition (LEC 3.0)

Instruction and practice in writing expository essays of substantial content and skill, with particular emphasis on the rhetorical applications of recent findings in language research. Papers required will include critical analyses of literary works, and library research. Prerequisite: English 1160 or 3560.


ENGLISH 3170 Teaching And Supervising Reading and Writing (LEC 3.0)

Students will study contemporary and traditional approaches to reading and writing instruction. The course will give students practice in applying literacy and composition theory and research to development of teaching methods, including course syllabi and assignments. Prerequisite: 6 hours of college level writing courses.


ENGLISH 3210 Survey Of Old And Middle English Literature (LEC 3.0)

Survey of Old English poetry in translation and Middle English literature (excluding Chaucer) through Malory. Special emphasis on culture and language with some attention given to modern reinterpretation of medieval works. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3211 Chaucer (LEC 3.0)

A study of Chaucer as a narrative poet by an intensive examination of The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3212 Sixteenth Century English Literature (LEC 3.0)

A survey of the poetry and prose of England from 1500 to 1600. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3213 Seventeenth Century English Literature (LEC 3.0)

A study of major authors (excluding Milton) of prose and poetry in England from 1600 to 1660. Special attention will be paid to John Donne and the metaphysical poets, to Ben Jonson and the Cavalier poets, and to major prose writers such as Francis Bacon, Sir Thomas Browne, and others. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3214 The Plays Of William Shakespeare (LEC 3.0)

Selected comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances from early middle, and late periods of William Shakespeare's life. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3215 The Restoration & Eighteenth Century (LEC 3.0)

The history, development, and cultural contexts of British literature from 1660 to 1798. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3216 British Romantic Literature (LEC 3.0)

A study of the prose and poetry of the British Romantic period, 1775 to 1832. Prerequisite: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3217 Victorian Literature (LEC 3.0)

A study of British prose and poetry from 1832 to 1900. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3218 The British Novel (LEC 3.0)

The history, development, and cultural contexts of the British novel from the late seventeenth century to the present. Prerequisite: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3219 The British Novel II (LEC 3.0)

A study of the development of the novel with major attention given to the Victorian and 20th century novelists. Prerequisites: ENGLISH 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3220 Early American Literature (LEC 3.0)

This course will follow the development of American literature from its Colonial beginnings (1614) to the rise of Romanticism (1836). The course will pay particular attention to how American writers used literature in defining and even creating the New World. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3221 American Poetry I (LEC 3.0)

A study of significant selected poets of, primarily, the 19th century, with special attention to theme, diction, and form, and to poetry as a compressed image of the human condition. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3222 The American Renaissance (LEC 3.0)

A study of American literature from Poe to Whitman. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3223 American Poetry II (LEC 3.0)

A study of significant selected poets of the 20th century, with special attention to theme, diction, and form, and poetry as a compressed image of the human condition. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3224 Southern Culture (LEC 3.0)

Introduction to major issues in the history and culture of the recent American South. Non-fiction, fiction, memoir, autobiography, journalism and film explore the social, economic, and political transformations of the region in the last half-century. Prerequisite: English 1120 and one semester of literature.


ENGLISH 3225 The American Novel I (LEC 3.0)

A study of selected, representative novels in chronological sequence from the beginning to the major realists. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3226 The American Novel II (LEC 3.0)

A study of selected, representative novels in chronological sequence from the major realists to the present. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3227 American Gothic (LEC 3.0)

This course follows the development of gothic/horror literature in the United States for its earliest expression in Phillip Freneau's 18th century works through Brockden Brown's late 18c. Gothic novels, to Hawthorne, Melville, and Poe's dark fiction, and finally to modern and contemporary works by Faulkner, O'Connor, Stephen King and others. Prerequisite: English 1120 and a previous literature course.


ENGLISH 3228 The American Experience (LEC 3.0)

Examines one or more of the subjects of the American experience such as race, gender, class, ethnicity, region, technology, religion, as it is expressed in the culture. Prerequisite: English 1223.


ENGLISH 3232 Contemporary American Literature (LEC 3.0)

Studies in American prose (fiction and non-fiction), drama, poetry, and screen plays published within the last fifteen years. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3233 Contemporary British Literature (LEC 3.0)

Studies in British prose (fiction and non-fiction), drama, poetry, and screen plays published within the last fifteen years. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3234 Myth & Folklore (LEC 3.0)

This course traces the development of myth and folklore from Ancient Mesopotamia through nineteenth century Europe. Students will be challenged with three questions along the way: What do myth and folklore do? Why were they important to earlier societies? Is myth alive today? Prerequisites: English 1120 and one semester of college literature.


ENGLISH 3301 A Linguistic Study Of Modern English (LEC 3.0)

A descriptive analysis of Modern English--its phonology, grammar, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: English 1120.


ENGLISH 3302 History And Structure Of The English Language (LEC 3.0)

An introduction to the study of the English language and its history through Old English, Middle English, and Modern English. Prerequisite: English 1120.


ENGLISH 3303 The Grammatical Structure of English (LEC 3.0)

The Grammatical Structure of English takes a linguistic approach to the study of the structure of present day English with a focus on morphology (the formation of words) and syntax (sentence structure). The course centers on form and function at the level of the word, phrase, and clause, using tree diagramming as the central mode of inquiry and analysis. Prerequisites: English 1120.


ENGLISH 3304 Language in Society (LEC 3.0)

Language in Society takes a sociolinguistic approach to the investigation of language variation and change in society, including: intersections of language and identity, race, gender, class, and other social factors; language ideologies; multilingualism; language standardization; pragmatics; and language policy and planning. Prerequisites: English 1120.


ENGLISH 3550 Writing for Social Media (LEC 3.0)

The theory and practice of writing for social media. Emphasis on the role of social media in industry. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing. (Co-listed with TCH COM 3550).


ENGLISH 3560 Technical Writing (LEC 3.0)

The theory and practice of writing technical papers and reports in the professions. Prerequisites: English 1120.


ENGLISH 3590 Game Studies (LEC 3.0)

An introduction to the study of games with an emphasis on their pedagogical and communicative uses. May cover topics such as game theory and design, gamification of classroom or workplace activities, game genres, and writing game narratives. Prerequisites: One semester of literature or composition. (Co-listed with TCH COM 3590).


ENGLISH 4099 Undergraduate Research (IND 0.0-6.0)

Designed for the undergraduate student who wishes to engage in research. Not for graduate credit. Not more than six (6) credit hours allowed for graduation credit. Subject and credit to be arranged with the instructor. Consent of instructor required.


ENGLISH 4290 Texts And Contexts (LEC 3.0)

Examines the relationships between selected texts written or published in a given year and the context of events of that time. Also explores current critical approaches to such texts and contexts. Writing intensive and Computer intensive. Prerequisites: English 1120 and a semester of college literature; junior standing.


ENGLISH 5000 Special Problems (IND 0.0-6.0)

Problems or readings on specific subjects or projects in the department. Consent of instructor required.


ENGLISH 5001 Special Topics (IND 0.0-6.0)

This course is designed to give the department an opportunity to test a new course. Variable title.


ENGLISH 5100 Readings In Rhetoric And Composition (LEC 3.0)

Directed readings and writing on selected topics and areas in Rhetoric and Composition. Credit will only be given for one of English 5210, 5220, 5230, or 5100 toward the Coop MA with UMSL. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.


ENGLISH 5210 Readings In British Literature (LEC 3.0)

Directed readings and writing on selected topics and areas in British literature. Credit will only be given for one of English 5210, 5220, 5230, or 5100 toward the Coop MA with UMSL. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.


ENGLISH 5220 Readings In American Literature (LEC 3.0)

Directed readings and writing on selected topics and areas in American literature. Credit will only be given for one of English 402, 403, 404, or 405 toward the Coop MA with UMSL. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.


ENGLISH 5230 Readings In Literature And Theory (LEC 3.0)

Directed readings and writing on selected topics and areas in Literature and Theory. Credit will only be given for one of English 5210, 5220, 5230, or 5100 toward the Coop MA with UMSL. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.


ENGLISH 5571 Advanced Writing For Science & Engineering (LEC 3.0)

Focus on writing applications specifically for students in scientific or engineering fields. Primary emphases will be on producing effective and readable professional writing. Prerequisites: English 3560 and 2560, or graduate standing.


ENGLISH 5572 Advanced Writing For Science And Engineering II (LEC 2.0)

This course -- second in a series -- focuses on writing for publication, from the initial proposal and query to the final product. Students will work on the materials they have underway with their advisers and/or research colleagues. Prerequisites: English 3560 and 2560, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 1600 Introduction to Technical Communication (LEC 3.0)

Introduction to the role of the professional technical communicator in business and industry and practice in methods of developing technical documents. Prerequisite: English 1120. (Co-listed with English 1600).


TCH COM 2540 Layout and Design (LEC 3.0)

Theory and practice of layout and design for print and electronic media. Prerequisite: TCH COM 1600 or English 1600. (Co-listed with English 2540).


TCH COM 2560 Technical Marketing Communication (LEC 3.0)

An introduction to technical marketing communication with an emphasis on relevant genres such as (but not limited to) the data sheet, white paper, and technical demonstration. Prerequisites: English 1600 or Tch Com 1600 or English 1160. (Co-listed with ENGLISH 2560).


TCH COM 3000 Special Problems (IND 0.0-6.0)

Problems or readings on specific subjects or projects in the department. Consent of instructor required.


TCH COM 3001 Special Topics (LEC 0.0-6.0)

This course is designed to give the department an opportunity to test a new course. Variable title.


TCH COM 3010 Seminar (RSD 0.0-6.0)

Discussion of current topics. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing.


TCH COM 3440 Theory of Visual Technical Communication (LEC 3.0)

A study of the relationships between visual and conceptual elements of technical communication. Prerequisites: TCH COM 1600 or ENGLISH 1600; TCH COM 2540 or ENGLISH 2540.


TCH COM 3550 Writing for Social Media (LEC 3.0)

The theory and practice of writing for social media. Emphasis on the role of social media in industry. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing. (Co-listed with ENGL 3550).


TCH COM 3570 Writing in the Sciences (LEC 3.0)

This course is designed to teach students how to write effectively in the sciences. Writing assignments include short reports, proposals, and a major project such as a research or analytical report or a procedures/instructions manual. Emphasis is placed on clarity, conciseness, organization, format, style, and tone. Prerequisites: English 1120 or equivalent.


TCH COM 3580 Business Communication (LEC 3.0)

The principles and practice of business communication. Covers topics such as genres of business writing, business uses of social media, branding and content strategy, and intercultural business communication. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing.


TCH COM 3590 Game Studies (LEC 3.0)

An introduction to the study of games with an emphasis on their pedagogical and communicative uses. May cover topics such as game theory and design, gamification of classroom or workplace activities, game genres, and writing game narratives. Prerequisites: One semester of literature or composition.


TCH COM 4085 Internship (IND 0.0-6.0)

Internship will involve students applying critical thinking skills and discipline specific knowledge in a work setting based on a project designed by the advisor and employee. Activities will vary depending on the student's background and the setting. Prerequisites: Must have completed 24 hours in the major core curriculum.


TCH COM 4099 Research (IND 0.0-15)

Investigations of an advanced nature leading to the preparation of a thesis or dissertation. Consent of instructor required.


TCH COM 4410 Theory and Practice of Technical Communication (LEC 3.0)

This capstone course enables the student to work on individual and group projects that put into play the theories and practices of technical communication. Students are expected to develop professional portfolios. Prerequisites: Tch Com 1600 or English 1600; Tch Com 2540 or English 2540.


TCH COM 4450 International Dimensions of Technical Communication (LEC 3.0)

Examines complexity of communication of technical information worldwide. Includes topics such as graphics, icons, symbols; user interface design; intercultural communication. Students may not earn credit for both TCH COM 4450 and TCH COM 6450. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing and undergraduate standing.


TCH COM 4550 Proposal Writing (LEC 3.0)

Familiarizes students with many aspects of writing proposals for various purposes in academic, professional, and public spheres. Offers students opportunities to write documents to promote their academic, professional, or personal goals or those of their organization(s). Prerequisite: One semester of college composition or technical writing.


TCH COM 5000 Special Problems (IND 0.0-6.0)

Problems or readings on specific subjects or projects in the department. Consent of instructor required.


TCH COM 5001 Special Topics (LEC 0.0-6.0)

This course is designed to give the department an opportunity to test a new course. Variable title.


TCH COM 5010 Seminar (RSD 0.0-6.0)

Discussion of current topics. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 5040 Oral Examination (IND 0.0)

After completion of all other program requirements, oral examinations for on-campus M.S./Ph.D. students may be processed during intersession. Off-campus M.S. students must be enrolled in oral examination and must have paid an oral examination fee at the time of the defense/comprehensive examination (oral/written). All other students must enroll for credit commensurate with uses made of facilities and/or faculties. In no case shall this be for less than three (3) semester hours for resident students.


TCH COM 5099 Research (IND 0.0-15)

Investigations of an advanced nature leading to the preparation of a thesis or dissertation. Consent of instructor required.


TCH COM 5510 Technical Editing (LEC 3.0)

The principles and practices of technical editing, including usability, audience analysis, contextual editing, the conventions of scientific and technical communication, and the role of the editor in document development and publication. Students will also learn standard practices of copy editing and the use of style guides. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 5520 Help Authoring (LEC 3.0)

Students will acquire the technological and rhetorical skills necessary for creating effective online help systems, including context-sensitive help for computer applications. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 5530 Usability Studies (LEC 3.0)

Students in this course will study and apply methods used by technical communicators to evaluate usability. Students will study methods used to evaluate human interaction with communication tools and how to make those products more suitable for human use. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 5540 Advanced Layout and Design (LEC 3.0)

Advanced theory and practice of layout and design for print and electronic media. Prerequisite: English 2540 or TCH COM 2540, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 5550 Advanced Proposal Writing (LEC 3.0)

Familiarizes graduate students with many aspects of writing proposals for various purposes in academic, professional, and public spheres. Offers opportunities to write documents to promote their academic, professional, or personal goals or those of their organization(s). Credit will not be given for both TCH COM 4550 and TCH COM 5550. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.


TCH COM 5560 Web-Based Communication (LEC 3.0)

Covers such topics as advanced writing and editing for the web; the creation of rhetorically effective websites; the use of blogs, wikis, and other web genres to communicate technical information. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 5610 History of Technical Communication (LEC 3.0)

Introduction to the roles of the technical communicator and the technologies of communication from ancient cultures to the present. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing, or graduate standing.


TCH COM 5620 Research Methods in Technical Communication (LEC 3.0)

Students learn essential research methods in technical communication, including audience analysis, interviewing techniques, working with subject matter experts, and experimental research design. Prerequisites: One semester of college composition or technical writing, or graduate standing.


Trent Alan Brown, Professor
PHD University of Chicago

Eric Shane Bryan, Associate Professor
PHD Saint Louis University

Anne Lucile Cotterill, Emeritus
PHD Washington University

Carleigh Davis, Assistant Professor
PHD East Carolina University

Kathryn C Dolan, Associate Professor
PHD University of California-Santa Barbara

Kathleen M Drowne, Professor
PHD University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Mathew R Goldberg, Associate Teaching Professor
MFA University of Arkansas Fayetteville

Sarah Hercula, Assistant Professor
PHD Illinois State University

Jossalyn Gale Larson, Assistant Teaching Professor
MA Saint Louis University

Edward A. Malone, Professor
PHD Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Kathryn Michele Northcut, Professor
PHD Texas Tech University

Daniel Charles Reardon, Associate Professor
PHD SUNY College at Albany

Elizabeth Roberson, Assistant Teaching Professor
MS Missouri University of Science and Technology

Rachel Schneider, Assistant Teaching Professor
PHD University of Texas at Austin

Kristine Swenson, Professor
PHD University of Iowa

Kelly Jeanne Tate, Associate Teaching Professor
MFA University of Arkansas Fayetteville

Michael David Wright, Associate Professor
PHD Oklahoma State University Main

Superscripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in the faculty listing refer to the following common footnotes:
1 Registered Professional Engineer
2 Registered Geologist
3 Certified Health Physicist
4 Registered Architect
5 Board Certified, American Academy of Environmental Engineers
6 LEED AP Certified